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Female Improvement Mrs. John Sandford

Female Improvement

Mrs. John Sandford

Published February 6th 2012
ISBN : 9781150216145
Paperback
160 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1836. Excerpt: ... FEMALE IMPROVEMENT. CHAPTER VIII.MoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1836. Excerpt: ... FEMALE IMPROVEMENT. CHAPTER VIII. ACCOMPLISHMENT. The term accomplishment admits of an extensive meaning. By an accomplished person may be implied one well versed in intellectual, as well as elegant attainments, --qualified by natural and acquired endowments to adorn an elevated social station, --and so raised above the ordinary level as to afford a sample of a finished state of culture, and to represent the best tone of mind and manners which the age can realise. We may be allowed, however, to understand accomplishment in its more restricted sense, and to express by it a proficiency in such arts as embellish the character, and VOL. II. B improve and refine the taste- but which, although contributing to general grace and agreeableness, are not absolutely essential to mental improvement, or indispensable to moral discipline. In short, by accomplishment may be intended the ornamental branches of education, which some cultivate almost exclusively, and which a few as exclusively decry and reject- and of which, whilst the inordinate pursuit cannot be justified, it may, we hope, be shown that the tendency is to render us more amiable, to increase our own capacity of allowed enjoyment, and to enable us to contribute more frequently and effectually to that of others. To understand the value of accomplishments, and also to regulate our cultivation of them, we must clearly perceive, and bear in mind their legitimate object. The undue depreciation, or the abuse, proceeds from the losing sight of this. The utilitarian, who forgets how much refinement of taste may conduce to happiness and virtue, contemns all that relates to the mere polish of the mind. On the other hand, the worldly and the frivolous, who care only for selfish pleasure or distinction, esteem and cultiv.