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No Other Way Ben DeWitt

No Other Way

Ben DeWitt

Published June 15th 1999
ISBN : 9780966538700
Paperback
256 pages
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 About the Book 

Two American soldiers from completely diverse backgrounds are pressed into service with the fledgling CIA in 1950. Lt. Al Houer, third generation VMI graduate, recruits Corporal William B. Booth, a Texas roughneck who got kicked off the University ofMoreTwo American soldiers from completely diverse backgrounds are pressed into service with the fledgling CIA in 1950. Lt. Al Houer, third generation VMI graduate, recruits Corporal William B. Booth, a Texas roughneck who got kicked off the University of Michigan football team, into the military intelligence unit in Japan. After North Korea attacked the Syngman Rhea forces, the two were pressed into service with the CIA. Their assignment was to go in as backup for naval Lieutenant Clark who was going to land at Inchon before the U.N. Forces.But war was already raging throughout the area surrounding Inchon, as the sneaky Pete team soon discovered. They joined forces with a ragtag group of survivors including U.S. soldiers, South Korean soldiers and a Canadian housewife, Jennifer Parks. With limited resources, they radioed information to U.S. troops about enemy locations and fought their way to the Kimpo Airfield. General MacArthur himself saluted their arrival.Proving they could work together in spite of their philosophical and social differences, Houer and Booth were assigned the job of creating Escape and Evacuation plans for pilots flying over South Korea. While mapping the trails from the air, they discovered what Houer had predicted from the beginning—Chinese forces moving down from the North across the Manchurian plain. Houer and Booth faced their greatest challenge as part of the decisive clandestine operation of the Korean War: The TP Stole Affair. A Norwegian cargo ship carrying medical supplies to the Chinese Communist troops had to be intercepted and destroyed. To Houer, the action meant killing civilians. To Booth, it was helping our troops to survive.When honor and duty collide...there&39-s no other way.